The relationship between obsessions and the self: Feared and actual self-descriptions in a clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder sample
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The relationship between obsessions and the self: Feared and actual self-descriptions in a clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder sample

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The relationship between obsessions and the self: Feared and actual self-descriptions in a clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder sample

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dc.contributor.author Llorens Aguilar, Sara
dc.contributor.author Arnáez, Sandra
dc.contributor.author Aardema, Frederick
dc.contributor.author García Soriano, Gemma
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-03T16:04:46Z
dc.date.available 2021-09-03T16:04:46Z
dc.date.issued 2022
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/80220
dc.description.abstract Cognitive models of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) posit the relevance of the self in OCD, although the nature of this association is still unclear. We aimed to explore actual and feared selves and its association with obsessions and intrusions in a group of OCD patients. A group of 58 patients with OCD identified their most upsetting obsession and intrusion (non-clinical obsession) experienced in the past 3 months. These cognitions were classified as either moral-based or autogenous (obsessions n = 32; intrusions n = 26) or non-moral-based or reactive, depending on their content. Next, patients described their actual self and their feared self, that is, the person they feared being or becoming, and whether they believed these descriptions were associated with their obsessions/intrusions. Results indicate that individuals with OCD described themselves as insecure, anxious and fearful, but also as good and nice. They particularly feared a selfish, aggressive, bad, liar, coward, insecure and arrogant self. Two-thirds of the patients believed that their obsessions said something about their actual self (65.52%) and that their obsessions brought them closer to the person they do not want to be (62.06%). A third of patients believed their intrusions said something about their actual self (actual self: 30.35%; feared self: 25%), which was a significantly lower percentage than for obsessions. These associations existed independent from the content of the obsession and/or intrusion, although patients with obsessions with moral-based contents more often tended to believe that their obsessions brought them closer to the person they do not want to be. Results suggest the relevance of the real and feared selves in the maintenance of obsessions.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy: an international journal of theory and practice, 2022
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Llorens-Aguilar, S., García-Soriano, G., Arnáez, S., Aardema, F., & O’Connor, K. (2022) The relationship between obsessions and the self: Feared and actual self-descriptions in a clinical obsessive–compulsive disorder sample. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 29, 642-651
dc.subject Psicologia
dc.title The relationship between obsessions and the self: Feared and actual self-descriptions in a clinical obsessive-compulsive disorder sample
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2021-09-03T16:04:46Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.2656
dc.identifier.idgrec 147603

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