Ecological specialization to fluctuating resources prevents long-distance migratory raptors from becoming sedentary on islands.
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Ecological specialization to fluctuating resources prevents long-distance migratory raptors from becoming sedentary on islands.

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Ecological specialization to fluctuating resources prevents long-distance migratory raptors from becoming sedentary on islands.

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dc.contributor.author Gangoso, Laura
dc.contributor.author López López, Pascual
dc.contributor.author Grande, Juan Manuel
dc.contributor.author Mellone, Ugo
dc.contributor.author Limiñana, Rubén
dc.contributor.author Urios, Vicente
dc.contributor.author Ferrer, Miguel
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-09T12:05:23Z
dc.date.available 2020-04-09T12:05:23Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10550/73867
dc.description.abstract Background The adaptive transition between behavioral strategies, such as the shift from migratoriness to sedentariness, remains an outstanding question in evolutionary ecology. Density-dependent variation in the age of first breeding has been proposed as a feasible mechanism through which long-lived migratory birds with deferred sexual maturity should become sedentary to persist on islands. Although this pattern seems to hold for most raptors and herons, a few exceptions have been identified. One of these exceptions is the Eleonora's falcon, a long-distance migratory bird, which shows one of the most peculiar adaptations in the timing of reproduction and food requirements among raptors. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we compiled data concerning demography, banding recoveries and satellite tracking of Eleonora's falcons to discuss likely explanations for the exceptional behavior of this insular long-distance migratory species. Conclusions/Significance New data reveal that Eleonora's falcons do return to the natal colonies in their first year and young birds are able to breed. However, in contrast to previous hypothesis, the highly specialized strategy of this and other ecologically similar species, as well as the virtual lack of food during winter at breeding areas prevent them from becoming sedentary on islands. Although the ultimate mechanisms underlying the process of sedentarization remain poorly understood, the evidence provided reveal the existence of important trade-offs associated with ecological specialization that may become particularly relevant in the present context of global change.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.relation.ispartof Plos One, 2013, vol. 8, num. 4, p. e61615
dc.rights.uri info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.source Gangoso, Laura López López, Pascual Grande, Juan Manuel Mellone, Ugo Limiñana, Rubén Urios, Vicente Ferrer, Miguel 2013 Ecological specialization to fluctuating resources prevents long-distance migratory raptors from becoming sedentary on islands. Plos One 8 4 e61615
dc.subject Zoologia
dc.subject Biologia
dc.title Ecological specialization to fluctuating resources prevents long-distance migratory raptors from becoming sedentary on islands.
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated 2020-04-09T12:05:23Z
dc.identifier.doi https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0061615
dc.identifier.idgrec 137073

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